Research

Local adaptation in phoretic mites

Poecilochirus mites on a Nicrophorus burying beetleVariation among habitats can cause differential selection on different populations of a species, leading to local adaptation of populations to their specific habitats. While the habitat variation can be abiotic, symbiotic species are exposed to additional layers of variation and may locally adapt to their symbionts. The project is tailored to assess local adaptation in the mite Poecilochirus carabi, which lives in close sympatry with Nicrophorus burying beetles. We will analyse the cross-population variability of Poecilochirus mites across different geographic scales and test predictions for (co-evolutionary) local adaptation. The project is funded by the Freiburg Research Innovation Fund and the German Research Foundation (DFG).

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Recognition in leaf-cutting ants

Acromyrmex workersCommunication is the key feature of societies. Besides humans, the pinnacle of social evolution is embodied in the social insects, whose organisation is maximised by elaborate division of labour. Despite being object of intense research spanning many decades, the communication codes of social insects and their evolutionary origin are still largely unknown.

As a model system I used an ecologically tremendously successful and important group of ants, the leafcutters – which build societies of millions of workers – to find the general proximate and ultimate mechanisms underlying successful communication both at the individual and at the colony level. I also also addressed the question of whether individuals could exploit information for their personal benefit at the expense of the society. Finally, studied the adaptations that allow social parasites to break the communication code and invade leaf-cutting ant societies. I used an integrated multidisciplinary approach including electro- and neurophysiology, genetics, chemical analyses and behavioural observationsdaad-logo and experiments. Funding for my project was provided by CODICES and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

Nehring, V., Dani, F.R., Turillazzi, S., Bohn, H., Klass, K.-D.,  d’Ettorre, P. (2016): Chemical disguise of myrmecophilous cockroaches and its implications for understanding nestmate recognition mechanisms in leaf-cutting ants BMC Ecol. 16: 35. do: 10.1186/s12898-016-0089-5

Nehring, V., Dani, F.R., Turillazzi, S.; Boomsma, J.J., d’Ettorre, P. (2015): Integration strategies of a leaf-cutting ant social parasite. Anim. Behav. 108: 55-65. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.07.009

Larsen, J., Fouks, B., Bos, N., d’Ettorre, P., Nehring, V. (2014):  Variation in nestmate recognition ability among polymorphic leaf-cutting ant workers. J. Insect Physiol. 70, 59–66. doi:10.1016/j.jinsphys.2014.09.002

Nehring, V., Boomsma, J.J. & d’Ettorre, P. (2012): Wingless virgin queens assume helper roles in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants. Curr. Biol. 22: R671-R673. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2012.06.038 (press release)

Nehring, V., Evison, S.E.F, Santorelli, L.A., d’Ettorre, P. & Hughes, W.O.H. (2011): Kin-informative recognition cues in ants. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 278: 1942-1948. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.2295 (pdf | press release)

Fouks, B., d’Ettorre, P. & Nehring, V. (2011): Brood adoption in the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior : Adaptation or recognition noise? Insect. Soc. 58: 479-485. doi: 10.1007/s00040-011-0167-9. (pdf)

Larsen, J., Fouks, B., Bos, N., d’Ettorre, P., Nehring, V. (2014):  Variation in nestmate recognition ability among polymorphic leaf-cutting ant workers. J. Insect Physiol. 70, 59–66. doi:10.1016/j.jinsphys.2014.09.002

Nehring, V., Dani, F.R., Turillazzi, S.; Boomsma, J.J.; d’Ettorre, P. (2015): Integration strategies of a leaf-cutting ant social parasite. Anim. Behav. 108: 55-65. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.07.009

Host-choice in phoretic mites

Mites of the genus Poecilochirus  are phoretic on burying beetles and the mite adults reproduce at carcasses monopolized by their carriers. The mites can benefit from associations with an array of carrion beetles, but have one main host that provides an optimal environment for reproduction. The mites seem be able to estimate the suitability of different host species and choose the one that fits best.

Logo Wissenschaftliche Gesellschaft FreiburgI investigate the sensory ecology of the mites and the chemical substances that enable them to differentiate between beetle species, using behavioural experiments and analytical chemistry methods. The project is supported by the German Academic Exchange service and the Wissenschaftliche Gesellschaft Freiburg.daad-logo

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